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Health Chief Details Plan to Protect Troops in West Africa

  • Written by Sean Carmichael
  • Published in Health

 

U.S. troops will be protected while doing their critical work in West Africa—helping the U.S. Agency for International Development stop the deadly Ebola outbreak there—and after they come home, the assistant secretary of defense for health affairs said in a recent interview.

Speaking Oct. 17 with DoD News, Dr. Jonathan Woodson detailed the Defense Department’s plan for keeping troops safe while they’re deployed in West Africa, getting them home for treatment if a servicemember becomes infected, and making sure their families and communities are safe when all the troops come home.

 

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The Unveiling of the Carl-Gustaf M4 Recoilless Rifle

Recoilless rifles have played a role in the U.S. Armed Forces since The Great War. Recently, recoilless rifles have emerged as emblematic symbol of the ongoing Syrian Civil War. As technology has advanced, contemporary recoilless rifles have grown smaller and lighter. However, their firepower, versatility and range continue to improve.

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Intelligence Opportunities

  • Written by Sean Carmichael
  • Published in Intelligence

The military intelligence field offers some of the best opportunities for those looking to advance as Army warrant officers, recent coverage in Army Times indicates.

Of 14 sought-after warrant officer fields, the publication found, fully half were in intelligence. The Army, which currently has some 15,000 members of the warrant officer corps, is looking to hire some 900 warrant officers this year, and the National Guard and Reserves are reporting shortages.

 

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GA-ASI Radar Shines during U.S. Navy Spearhead IIA Exercise

General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc. (GA ASI), a leading manufacturer of remotely piloted aircraft systems, radars, and electro-optical and related mission systems solutions, today announced that its Lynx Multi-mode Radar successfully demonstrated the ability to support maritime operations in a littoral environment during the recent U.S. Navy Exercise Spearhead IIA held off the coast of Key West, Fla., in June.

Integrated aboard a Predator B/MQ-9 Reaper surrogate (King Air 350), Lynx’s Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Maritime Wide-Area Search (MWAS) modes detected mine-like objects and very small vessels, including fast boats, sailboats and fishing boats.

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Airstrikes Against ISIS May Be Reflected in FY15 Defense Budget

The Obama administration has taken a strong stance regarding the Islamic State (formerly known as the Islamic State or Iraq and Syria, or ISIS) terrorist group. While there have been assurances that the United States would not be drawn into another Middle Eastern war, the administration has opted for airstrikes as their way of protecting the unstable region. To date, U.S. Central Command has conducted 98 air strikes across Iraq, 62 of them coming near the Mosul Dam, a hotbed for ISIS activity since their capture of the structure on August 7.

The U.S. assertion of power may not be without consequence, though, as officials believe that the airstrikes and associated support could be reflected in the not-yet-finalized fiscal year 2015 defense budget.

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Navy's Brand-New Aircraft Launch System Embarks on Below-Deck Testing

  • Written by Sean Carmichael
  • Published in Maritime

The Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) shipyard in Newport News, Va., is all abuzz as below deck-testing of the Navy’s newest aircraft launch system begins aboard USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78).

Following months of large-scale hardware deliveries containing critical components of the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) and shipboard installation by HII, teams from the government and industry partner General Atomics completed installation of the software--the brains of the new system

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Raytheon SM-6 Missiles Make History in Long-Range Supersonic Tests

A U.S. Navy ship using a Raytheon-made missile has destroyed a target in the longest-distance surface-to-air strike in naval history.

In a milestone series of three tests in June, the destroyer USS John Paul Jones used Standard Missile-6 (SM-6) interceptors to destroy cruise missile targets flying "over the horizon"--part of a Navy exercise that utilized a networked system of sensors, aircraft and ship-borne weapons. Separately, the John Paul Jones used another Raytheon SM-6 to intercept a target traveling at supersonic speeds.

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F-35B Successfully Completes Wet Runway and Crosswind Testing

  • Written by Sean Carmichael
  • Published in Industry

In an important program milestone enabling U.S. Marines Corps initial operational capability (IOC) certification, the Lockheed Martin F-35B recently completed required wet runway and crosswind testing at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif.

“This testing is absolutely critical to 2B flight software fleet release and the Marine Corps’ IOC,” said J.D. McFarlan, Lockheed Martin's vice president for F-35 Test & Verification. “Collectively, the results support clearing the 20 knot crosswind envelope for conventional take-offs and landings (CTOL), short take-offs (STO) and short landings (SL), with ideal handling quality ratings and meaningful improvement over legacy fourth-generational fighter aircraft.”

 

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General Atomics Awarded Future Aircraft Carrier Contract

  • Written by Sean Carmichael
  • Published in Industry

U.S. Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) awarded General Atomics (GA) an initial sole-source contract for Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) and Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) for the CVN 79 aircraft carrier to be named John F. Kennedy.

This contract is for the initial procurement of the long-lead-time materials in support of a full production contract for installation of EMALS and AAG into CVN 79, the second of the Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carriers. CVN 79 is scheduled to be delivered to the U.S. Navy in 2023.

 

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H.R. 3230 Passed, Providing $15 Billion Emergency VA Funding

  • Written by Sean Carmichael
  • Published in Health

On Thursday, August 7, President Obama signed into law H.R. 3230, the “VA Access, Choice and Accountability Act of 2014.” The bill provides $15 billion of emergency funding to ensure that veterans do not wait months for care when they are unable to be seen by VA doctors.

The bill comes into law in the wake of a scandal involving thousands of veterans waiting on long care lists that led to the resignation of former Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs Eric Shinseki. After Shinseki’s resignation in May, Obama vowed to get to the heart of the problem, a problem that was called to attention more than a decade ago but has recently taken the headlines.

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